A. Tse

 

Dr Amy Tse

(Professor & Associate Chair, Graduate Studies)

Contact:
Office: 9-11B Medical Sciences Building  (☎) 780.492.5796
Lab: 9-11 Medical Sciences Building  (☎) 780.492.5796
amy.tse@ualberta.ca

Education:
BSc (Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 1982)
PhD (Department of Physiology & Biophysics, University of Calgary, 1990)

Teaching: PMCOL343, PMCOL344, PMCOL512, PMCOL416*

Research: Regulation of calcium signals and exocytosis


Research Interests / Laboratory Techniques

 

There are three major areas of research:

1. Regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion

The endocrine response to stress is regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis hyperactivity is a common biological finding in patients with depression. The HPA hyperactivity is associated with a diminished ability of cortisol to suppress ACTH release from pituitary corticotropes. Our research focuses on understanding the cellular mechanisms involved in the inhibitory action of glucocorticoids on ACTH release. We employ POMC-eGFP mice that express the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) driven by the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) promoter to identify individual corticotropes among the heterogeneous population of pituitary cells.

2. Regulation of chemotransduction in carotid bodies

The ability to maintain an adequate supply of oxygen is essential for survival. The major peripheral sensor for arterial oxygen level is the glomus (type 1) cells in the carotid bodies. In patients with sleep apnea, the repetitive drop in arterial oxygen level during sleep leads to hyperactivity of the carotid bodies, resulting in an increase in sympathetic drive and development of hypertension and chronic heart failure. Our research focuses on understanding the factors that regulate the Ca2+ signals and transmitter release from single rat glomus cells.

3. Regulation of Ca2+ signals and exocytosis in pituitary gonadotropes

The secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) from gonadotropes is essential for reproduction. Our research focuses on understanding the regulation of Ca2+ signal and exocytosis in gonadotropes. We employ GRIC/R26-YFP mice in which the GnRH receptor-expressing gonadotropes are labeled with yellow fluorescent protein.


Selected Recent Publications / Recent Funding

Lee AK, Tse FW and Tse A. (2015) Arginine vasopressin (AVP) potentiates the stimulatory action of CRH on pituitary corticotropes via a protein kinase C dependent reduction of the background TREK-1 current. Endocrinology 156(10):3661-72. PMID: 26248219.

Tse A, Lee AK, Tse FW. (2013) Influence of arachidonic acid on the endocrine response to stress.  In: Arachidonic acid: dietary sources and general functions, Dumancas GG, Murdianti BS, Lucas (Eds.), Nova Science Publishers Inc, NY., Chapter 4, 51-62.  

Tse A, Yan L, Lee AK, Tse FW. (2012) Autocrine and paracrine actions of ATP in rat carotid body. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 90(6):705-711. PMID: 22509744.

Wang N, Lee AK, Yan L, Simpson MR, Tse A, Tse FW. (2012) Granule matrix property and rapid "kiss-and-run" exocytosis contribute to the different kinetics of catecholamine release from carotid glomus and adrenal chromaffin cells at matched quantal size. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 90(6):791-801. PMID: 22506963.

Tse A, Lee AK, Yan L, Tse FW. (2012) Influence of cholesterol on cellular signaling and fusion pore kinetics. J Mol Neurosci 48(2):395-401. PMID: 22467040.

Tse A, Lee AK, Tse FW. (2012) Ca2+ signaling and exocytosis in pituitary corticotropes. Cell Calcium. 51(3-4):253-259. PMID: 22225940.

Yan L, Lee AK, Tse FW, Tse A. (2012) Ca2+ homeostasis and exocytosis in carotid glomus cells: role of mitochondria. Cell Calcium 51(2):155-163. PMID:22209034.

Yeung-Yam-Wah V, Lee AK, Tse A. (2012) Arachidonic acid mobilizes Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum and an acidic store in rat pancreatic β cells. Cell Calcium 51(2):140-148. PMID: 22197025.

Lee AK, Yeung-Yam-Wah V, Tse FW, Tse A. (2011) Cholesterol elevation impaired glucose-stimulated Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic β cells. Endocrinology 152: 3351-3361. PMID:21712366.

Lee AK, Smart JL, Rubinstein M, Low MJ, Tse A. (2011) Reciprocal regulation of TREK-1 channels by arachidonic acid and CRH in mouse corticotropes. Endocrinology 152: 1901-1910. PMID: 21343252.